TABLE OF CONTENTS

  • Screener (not progress monitoring) up to 3 times a year for all students grades 2-10
  • Available for grades K and 1, but earlyReading is recommended for those grades
  • Computer adaptive
  • Students have between 30-60 questions on each test
  • aReasing Screening Reports
    • Group screening report
      • Data is shown in scaled scores (see tables), benchmarks that help predict whether or not a student is on track and percentile ranks to identify what is considered typical for that grade level.
      • Red Flag means the standard error measurement (SEM) is larger than expected and additional testing is required
      • Black Flag means additional testing was done and a precise score was not obtained
    • Group growth report
    • Screening to intervention
    • Impact
    • Class list
    • Individual skills report
      • Foundational Skills
      • Language
      • Reading Literature
      • Informational Reading
      • Each of these above areas is broken down to "Mastered, developing and future." It is important to note that the lists of Mastered, Developing, and Future skills are based on the student's total aReading score and not the specific questions answered during each administration. This is because aReading is a CAT (Computer Adaptive Test) and each student answers different questions.

AUTOreading

  • Measure of student's automatically with specific reading skills for students K-12 with 9 subtest. When used for progress monitoring, a teacher should select 1 subtest which matches the intervention. The student is allowed 6 seconds to respond.
    • Warm-up
    • Letter names
    • Letter sounds
    • Word identification
    • Decoding words
    • Encoding words
    • Vocabulary
    • Synonyms
    • Word morphology (identify word structures and relationships based on appropriate use of morphemes, roots, & affixes)
  • Screening - not all AUTOreading subtests are given as part of universal screening. Instead, specific combinations of subtests are used at each grade level.
  • Group Screening Report - 1 version shows each student's composite score and another that shows each student's individual screening subtest scores
  • Benchmarks predict which students are at risk. Students at "Some risk" are marked with an "!" Students at "high risk" are marked with "!!"
  • Percentile ranks help determine what is considered typical for the group and provide complementary information to benchmark goals. You can see the class, school, district, and national percentile ranks with color codes.
    • When looking at this data, FastBridge learning recommends that teachers use their school or district information so that you are comparing student that received the same instruction.
  • AUTOreading is for progress monitoring for students on grade level
  • AUTOreading Skills - for students below grade level



Graph Interpretation

If a student's progress is being monitored, it's likely that the level of a student's performance is too low. Therefore it is important to consider the sufficiency and trend of the data, during interpretion.


Sufficiency of Data

Make sure you have enough data before interpretation begins:

  1. Duration: For how long has the student been monitored? There must be at least 3 data points but usually you will need 9-12 to make a reliable decision.
  2. Frequency: How often has the student been monitored?


Trend

Is the student scoring at or above the goal?

  • If the trend line is ABOVE the goal line: Keep current intervention and increase goal
  • If the trend line is NEUTRAL or HORIZONTAL (points are above and below the line): Maintain current goal and instruction
  • If the trend line is BELOW the goal line: Keep current goal and modify instruction

CBN Reading English

  • Used to screen and monitor student reading progress
  • Teacher listens to a student read aloud from a grade level passage for one minute while recording student errors. Passages are for grades 1-8.
  • Screener for reading challenges up to three times a year for all students grade 2-8
  • Administered individually with each student reading from a paper form and the teacher is recording errors as the student reads
  • Error Types
    • Mispronunciation or miscue
    • Added endings (miscue)
    • Word substitutions (miscue)
    • Omission
    • Word reversal
    • The second pause
    • Repetition
    • Dialect differences (i.e. students reads "fur" instead of "for")
    • Insertion
    • Self-correct


The CBMreading Group Screening Report shows the students' names and scores for all benchmark periods when the assessment was given. the default view includes listing the students in alphabetical order by last name. It is possible to re-order the students by any of the report columns and the above view shows the students in order by percentile ranks. Class, School, and District percentile ranks are provided unless fewer than 70% of the students in a group have completed the assessment. National percentiles are always displayed. The last section of the report displays group data, including the average, median, and standard deviation, as well as the minimum and maximum. A key to the risk levels and percentile colors is at the bottom of the report.


Graph Interpretation 

If a student's progress is being monitored, it's likely that the level of a student's performance is too low. Therefore it is important to consider the sufficiency and trend of the data, during interpretation.


Sufficiency of Data

Make sure you have enough data before interpretation begins:

  • Duration For how long has the student been monitored? There must be at least three data points but usually you will need 9-12 to make a reliable decision.
  • Frequency: How often has the student been monitored?

Trend

Is the student scoring at or above the goal?

  • If the trend line is ABOVE the goal line: Keep current intervention and increase goal.
  • If the trend line is NEUTRAL or HORIZONTAL (points are above and below the line): Maintain current goal and instruction
  • If the trend line is BELOW the goal line: Keep current goal and modify instruction

Accuracy

There is a small graph depicting the number of errors that the student made during each progress assessment


Early Reading - FastBridge Resource

These subtests can be used for both screening and progress monitoring


CompEffeciency - FastBridge Resource

  • Reading comprehension assessment
  • Computer administered and computer scored
  • Timed, but students are allowed to complete at their own pace. The student's total elapsed time to complete the measure is used to calculate reading rate.
  • Passages are 250-500 words long
  • Screening three times a year
  • Can also be used for progress monitoring

aMath - FastBridge Resource

  • Screener for students' broad math abilities, not available for progress monitoring
  • Computer adaptive, students respond to 30-60 questions on each testing occasion
  • 2019-2020 school year will add aMath items for grades 9-12as Lab items
  • Screener for students grades 2-8 three times a year
  • Also available for grades K and 1, but earlyMath is recommended for students that age
  • aMath Group Screening report is shown below


Interpreting the aMath Group Screening Report

FastBridge displays results in several ways. When interpreting this report, keep in mind:


Scaled Scores report a students' overall performance and range from 155 to over 255. Refer to the score guide to interpret scaled scores. The score guide describes typical skill development for each scaled score range. Benchmarks help predict which students are at-risk. A student not meeting the benchmark is either at "some risk" or at "high risk" of not being on track. Students at some risk are marked with one exclamation mark. Those at high risk are marked with two exclamation marks. The advanced benchmark star shows that the student is at the 80th percentile or higher based on national norms.

Percentile ranks help determined what is considered typical for the group and provide complementary information to benchmark goals. The FastBridge system displays class, school, district, and national percentile ranks with color-codes. Each use school or district percentile ranks when reviewing student scores. This is so that students are compared to other students who participated in the same instruction


An aMath score with a flag next to it means that the standard error of measurement (SEM) for that score is larger than usual.


There are two flag colors and they mean different things.

  • Red Flag: means that the SEM for the student's score was larger than expected and additional testing might be needed.
  • Black Flag: means that additional testing was done and a precise score was not obtained.

Red flags will display first and either go away or become black after additional testing. A red flag will display next to the student's score in the screening page whenever the score has an unexpected SEM. Based on the student's response pattern with the difficulty level of items, the system was not able to get to a score that accurately reflects the current skill level. The student could have been distracted, unmotivated, or found the questions were too easy or too hard. There is a hover, when you put your mouse on the red flag on the screening page, that displays the following: 


The standard error of measurement is very large. In this instance, the assessment was either too easy or too hard. Allow the student to complete additional items on another day to get a more precise score.


Flagged Scores in Reports

Red flagged scores will display in:

  • Group Screening Report
  • Individual Skills Report
  • Class list Report

Black flagged scores will display in:
  • Group Screening Report
  • Group Growth Report
  • Individual Skills Report
  • Class List Report
  • Individual Benchmark Report
  • Screening to Intervention Report
  • Student at a Glance Report

A score that is flagged (red or black) will not be displayed in:

  • Impact Report
  • Number and Operations
  • Counting and Cardinality
  • Operations and Operations in Base Ten
  • Measurement and Data
  • Geometry
  • Individual Skills Report - popular report
    • This report provides a summary of each student's score in relation to the benchmarks, shows the score according to the different percentile rankings, and gives estimates of the student's current skills on each of the aMath skill domains


Following the summary are sections that list the student's current reading skills by six math domains:

  • Number and Operations
  • Counting and Cardinality
  • Operations and Algebraic Thinking
  • Number and Operations in Base Ten
  • Measurement and Data
  • Geometry

Within each category the skills are broken down into three categories that indicate whether the student has mastered them, is developing them, or if the skills will be learned in the future.


It is important to note that the lists of Mastered, Developing, and Future skills are based on the student's total aMath score and not the specific questions answered during each administration. This is because aMath is a CAT and each student answers different questions.


CBMmath Automaticity - FastBridge Resource

  • Timed computer-based assessment of math fact mastery for students in grades 1-3
  • Designed to be a screener 3 times a year for students in grades 1-3 and progress monitoring for students of all grades who are participating in math fact interventions

Interpreting the CBMmath Automatically Group Screening Report

Remember, FastBridge displays results in several ways. When interpreting the Group Screening Report, keep in mind:


Benchmarks are the score goals set for each grade at different times of the year. Benchmarks help predict which students are at-risk of reading difficulties. A student not meeting the benchmark is either at "some risk" or at "high risk" of not being on track to meet the established goals. Benchmarks are reported with exclamation marks. One exclamation mark (!) means some risk, and two exclamation marks (!!) mean high risk.

Percentile ranks help determine what is considered typical for the group and provide complementary information to benchmark goals. The FastBridge system displays class, school, district, and national percentile ranks with color-codes. Each color indicates a range of percentile ranks. FastBridge recommends that teachers use school or district percentile ranks when reviewing student scores. This is so that students are compared to other students who participated in the same instruction

Progress Monitoring is the process of checking each student's performance repeatedly to see if he or she is improving. Teachers typically use benchmarks and percentile ranks from local percentiles to determine which students to monitor. FastBridge recommends weekly progress monitoring

For detailed instructions about how to set up CBMmath Automaticity progress monitoring schedules view and complete the Progress Monitoring course. When monitoring student progress, it is helpful to set a specific goal. This helps teachers see if a student is responding to instruction.

The steps for setting student progress goals are numbered below; these steps are reflected in progress monitoring reports. As a FastBridge user, you have the opportunity to individualize steps 1 through 3.


Graph Interpretation

If a student's progress is being monitored, it's likely that the level of a student's performance is too low. Therefore it is important to consider the sufficiency and trend of the data, during interpretation.


Make sure you have enough data before interpretation begins:

  • DurationFor how long has the student been monitored? There must be at least three data points but usually you will need 9-12 to make a reliable decision.
  • Frequency: How often has the student been monitored


Trend

Is the student scoring at or above the goal?

  • If the trend line is ABOVE the goal line: Keep current intervention and increase goal
  • If the trend line is NEUTRAL or HORIZONTAL (points are above and below the line): Maintain current goal and instruction
  • If the trend line is BELOW the goal line: Keep current goal and modify instruction


Accuracy

There is a small graph depicting the number of errors that the student made during each progress assessment.


EarlyMath - FastBridge Resource

  • Progress monitoring in developing math skills
  • Teacher works with students 1:1 to complete each assessment for students K-1
  • 17 earlyMath subtests
  • As a screener, this is to assess students three times a year to get the earlyMath Composite
  • Detailed group report
    • Identify a student's strengths and weaknesses across the composite subtests
  • Individual Skills Report
    • Provides a breakdown for each subtest



Interpreting the earlyMath Composite Reports

Remember, FastBridge displays results in several ways. When interpreting the reports, keep in mind:


Benchmarks are the score goals set for each grade at different times of the year. Benchmarks help predict which students are at-risk of math difficulties. A student not meeting the benchmark is either at "some risk" or at "high risk" of not being on track to meet established goals. Benchmarks are reported with exclamation marks. One exclamation mark (!) means some risk, and two exclamation marks (!!) mean high risk.


Percentile ranks help determine what is considered typical for the group and provide complementary information to benchmark goals. The FastBridge system displays class, school, district and national percentile ranks with color-codes. Each color indicates a range of percentile ranks. FastBridge recommends that teachers use school or district percentile ranks when reviewing student scores. This is so that students are compared to other students who participated in the same instruction.


Selecting an earlyMath Progress Measure

In the excerpt from a Detailed Group Report below, there are three students with one exclamation mark indicating at-risk scores on Place Value in the winter screening composite. In this case, providing a place value intervention and using the Place Value subtest for progress monitoring would make sense.




Developmental Milestones - devMilestones

  • 47 items is an observation based rating system that tracks student development across six developmental domains that span pre-K-1st grade, not available for progress monitoring
  • Criterion referenced
  • Each item is developmental in nature
  • For use in monitoring development for all students, including those with known or suspected delays or disabilities
  • Each student's current level of behavior is scored with either
    • Inquiring
    • Emerging
    • Incorporating
    • Mastering
  • Domains are:
    • Language, literacy, and communications
    • Cognitive development
    • Social and emotional development
    • Creativity and the arts
    • Approaches to learning
    • Physical and motor development


Report Interpretation

devMilestones is intended for use in evaluating student achievement of developmental milestones within multiple domains of functioning. The 47 items comprising devMilestones correspond to six subscales, each of which represents a domain of functioning. These include:

  • Language, Literacy, and Communications: skills related to a student's ability to acquire and use language in support of academic tasks and social interactions
  • Cognitive Development: skills related to a student's ability to acquire and use mathematical knowledge in support of academic tasks. Also reflective of a student's capacity to reason and appreciate human interconnectedness on a local and global scale
  • Social and Emotional Development: skills related to a student's awareness of his or her own cognitions, emotions, and behaviors, as well as that of other adults and peers. Also related to a student's sense of self and ability to establish and maintain relationships with adults and peers
  • Creativity and the Arts: skills related to a student's capacity to appreciate art, as well as generate artistic works
  • Approaches to Learning: attitudes and behaviors that influence a student's ability to effectively engage and benefit from instruction
  • Physical and Motor Development: skills and behaviors indicative of a student's physical capabilities and understanding of physical health and well-being


Score Interpretation

Higher item scores, total subscale scores, and overall composite scores correspond to better student performance and more advanced development. Scores can be interpreted in order to address instructional needs for individual students as well as for groups of students. For screening purposes, to interpret the various scores for an individual student, it is recommended that his or her scores be compared to expected performance benchmarks that are built into the devMilestones system. This approach allows educators to determine how the student is performing relative to standards for each individual skill, domain of skills, and overall developmental performance. Visual conventions are used within the Group Screening Report to indicate when the ratings for a student's performance indicate that there could be some risk (indicated by a single !) or a high risk (indicated by a double !!) that the student is performing below developmental expectations.


For instance, if a pre-kindergarten student's Approaches to Learning fall subscale score is equal to six, given established benchmarks within devMilestones for that age group, no visual convention indicating risk will be displayed next to the child's score and the teacher can infer that the child is performing within expected ranges for the preschool age group. By comparison, if a kindergarten student's Approaches to Learning fall subscale score is equal to six, then given established benchmarks for that age group, two exclamation points would appear next to the score to indicate that there is a large discrepancy between the score received by the student and the expected performance. The teacher may then infer that there is a high risk that the student is not performing within expected ranges for the kindergarten age group and additional problem analysis, planning and implementation of intentional supports, and progress monitoring might be needed.


It is recommended that the interpretation of scores generated through devMilestones occur at the item, total subscale, and overall composite levels. Please see below for recommendations regarding how each score might be interpreted.

  • Item Scores: used to determine which specific skills should be targeted for intervention within a developmental hierarchy associated with the overall skill identified by the item. Lower scores (such as 1-2) suggest that the child is displaying prerequisite, or foundational skills, that are needed for eventual mastery of the skill identified by the item. Higher scores (such as 3-4) suggest that the child is displaying more consistent use of the skill in new ways and new situations, which is needed for skill mastery that reflects flexible and generalizable use. For items on which a child scores a 1 or a 2, the child's teacher should consider ways in which the child may be supported in achieving more sophisticated skills within the developmental hierarchy of the item. For example, within the Social Emotional Developmental subscale, a child may score a 1 on the item for "Child displays the ability to manage emotions and behaviors." With a rating of 1, the child is demonstrating foundational skills of being able to calm him/herself when feeling strong emotions. To support the student in achieving the next step in the developmental hierarchy (indicated by a score of 2 on the same item), the teacher may focus on teaching simple expectations and strategies for managing a range of emotions and behaviors, while also offering reminders and guidance as needed to help the child practice recognizing when certain expectations apply and use appropriate strategies when needed.
  • Total Subscale Scores: used to determine how the student is functioning within each of the developmental domains. Subscale scores are automatically calculated within each of the developmental domains. Subscale scores are automatically calculated within devMilestones and compared to established benchmarks and norms for expected performance within different age ranges. Very low scores, or those that are very discrepant from expected performance, are highlighted with two exclamation points to indicate high risk. If a score is flagged as "high risk," there are likely multiple skills within the developmental domain that the child is not performing as expected for his/her age group. Specific items within the subscale should then be examined to determine what instructional supports can be offered and whether or not additional evaluation is needed. Subscale scores can also be highlighted with a single exclamation point to indicate some risk. This should be interpreted to indicate a) a select skill or two for which the student is well below expectations and a targeted support might be needed, or b) there are multiple items that will benefit from intentional supports, but performance on those items is not too much lower than expected for the age group. Higher scores that are not highlighted in any way suggest the student is performing within or beyond an expected range for that developmental domain.
  • Overall Composite Score: used to determine how the student is performing overall. Overall Composite scores are automatically calculated within devMilestones and are compared to established benchmarks and norms for expected performance within different age ranges. The same visual conventions are used to highlight high and low risk based on performance ratings. Composite scores that are lower and identified as "high risk" suggest that there are multiple developmental domains for which the student is not performing in ways that are consistent with age group expectations. This should suggest to teachers that there is a need to explore new ways to meet the student's needs and gather more information that will support instructional planning and decision making. Composite scores identified as "some risk" also suggest that the student is not performing at age group expectations in all areas, but some exploration into specific domains and items within devMilestones might highlight intentional supports that could be provided to address a specific developmental need that is further monitored before additional steps are taken. Higher overall Composite scores that are not highlighted in any way suggest the student is performing within or beyond the expected range across all developmental domains.

SAEBRS (Social, Academic, and Emotional Behavior Risk Screener)

  • 19 item rating scale
  • Includes the following, (total behavior, 19 items)
    • Social behavior (6 items)
    • Academic behavior (6 items)
    • Emotional behavior (7 items)
  • Screening for all students in grades K-12 three times a year, not available for progress monitoring
  • Only one teacher can complete the SAEBRS for each student during a screening period


Interpreting the SAEBRS Group Screening Report

Each SAEBRS item has a score value from 0 through 3. These three scales combine to represent a Total Behavior (19 items) scale. The FastBridge system reports a student's overall performance on each SAEBRS scale as a sum of item scores within each scale ranging from:

  • 0-18 for Social Behavior
  • 0-18 for Academic Behavior
  • 0-21 for Emotional Behavior
  • 0-57 for Total Behavior

Users can use a menu at the top of the report to view one subscale at a time.




Above is a list of the items in each scale and the score values for each one. Some items have higher positive scores and other lower positive scores. This is done so that higher SAEBRS scores are indicative of better behavior.




mySAEBRS - FastBridge Resource

  • 20 item rating scale that students complete about their social, academic, and emotional behaviors
  • Total behavior (20 items)
    • Social behavior (7 items)
    • Academic behavior (6 items)
    • Emotional behavior (7 items)
  • Available for screening for all students in grades 2-12 three times a year, not available for progress monitoring.


Interpreting the mySAEBRS Group Screening Report

Each mySAEBRS item has a score value from 0 through 3. These three scales combine to represent a Total Behavior (20 items) scale. The FastBridge system reports a student's overall performance on each mySAEBRS scale as a sum of item scores within each scale ranging from:

  • 0-21 for Social behavior
  • 018 for Academic behavior
  • 0-21 for Emotional behavior
  • 0-80 for Total behavior




Above is a list of the items in each scale and the score values for each one. Some items have higher positive scores and other lower positive scores. This is done so that higher mySAEBRS scores are indicative of better behavior.





DBR: Direct Behavior Reading

  • Available for Fast Research Labs, use in conjunction with other FAST assessments that are not part of FAST research labs when making instructional decisions
  • DBR is intended to be used in evaluating student response to social-emotional and behavioral interventions. DBR is designed to track behaviors over time for students K-12 and is designed for progress monitoring, not screening
  • Can be used to track single items or multi-items